Blog Picture - Dimebon - Key to Alzheimer's?

Dimebon - Key to Alzheimer's?

An important new Alzheimer's trial is being conducted at Glasgow Memory Clinic. Dimebon a drug with a novel mechanism of action is being studied in a phase 111 trial The Connection Study.

The Connection Study is suitable for individuals with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. 

Important results from the first pivotal trial of Dimebon in Alzheimer's disease showed that patients treated with Dimebon experienced statistically significant improvements compared to placebo in key aspects of the disease -- memory and thinking, activities of daily living, behavior and overall function. Dimebon's benefit over placebo continued to increase throughout the 12-month treatment period. At the end of 12 months, Dimebon-treated patients were on average functioning as well or better than they had been at the start of the study on each of 5 clinical endpoints. These results were published in the July 19, 2008, edition of The Lancet.

Dimebon, potentially operates via a novel mitochondrial mechanism of action. In preclinical studies, Dimebon was shown to impact two key aspects of brain cell function: it promoted neurite outgrowth and it preserved mitochondrial function after brain cells were challenged with beta amyloid, a toxic substance often associated with Alzheimer's disease and the loss of brain cells.

"In experiments in which brain cells were exposed to different toxins, including beta amyloid, Dimebon was shown to stabilize mitochondrial function, a vital element of neuron function and survival," said Andrew Protter, Ph.D., vice president, preclinical development for Medivation. "These findings suggest that Dimebon may have benefits on slowing the progression of Alzheimer's disease by preserving mitochondrial function. This potential novel mechanism may help explain the clinical benefits seen to date in Alzheimer's patients treated with Dimebon."

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